[Journal] 10 things I wish able-bodied people WOULD assume about my health.

I’ve been keeping mostly to myself over the last few months to make health issues much more bearable. Lying in bed last night while waiting for my painkillers to kick in, something occured to me; people make a LOT of assumptions when you’re sick and most of them are awful. How many of you have heard the old nut of “But you don’t look sick!”?

So, if I had to deal with people assuming stuff about me, what would the best case scenario be? In a perfect world, what would I want them to me thinking?

1. “They’re young and have a disability parking permit. Their illness must be pretty serious.” 

I really wish this was the first thing that went through people’s heads rather than “fuck you, you’re faking and I need to let you know how disgruntled this makes me, even though it doesn’t affect me directly”. I’ve been accosted multiple times from both parents and elderly who should know better, and even had my car vandilised because I’m a twenty-something female with an invisible illness and everyone suddenly takes up the social justice sword the moment disabled parking is involved. If people were half as quick to assume there might be a reason you use the parking spaces as they are to condemn you for doing so, we wouldn’t have half the stigma against shit like this and I wouldn’t feel ashamed to need it on my really bad days.

2. “I can’t see any physical signs of an illness in them. I don’t doubt them in the slightest since invisible illnesses are a thing. In fact, they carry themselves incredibly well to pass as healthy.

No symptoms = not sick. I mean, come on. Everybody knows that. After all, there are clear and visible signs of Diabetes, cancer, Lupus, Fibromyalgia, mental health and immune disorders. 90% of the chronic pain kitties I know have gotten so good at ‘passing’ as healthy because it makes life easier. No questions, no judgemental stares and no people acting stupid trying to do what they think is the right thing without actually asking you.

3. “I haven’t heard from my chronically sick friend in a while. Rather than avoiding me, they must be really unwell or taking important time to themselves. I should send them a message and ask if they are okay.

Being sick is hard work. It drains you in ways you can’t even imagine until you’re living it, and it often leaves you with almost no energy for socialising or outings. Sometimes people take it personally and don’t have the experience to understand that it’s an incredibly complicated situation where nobody ultimately wins, rather than you expending energy to avoid them or cut off contact.

4. “They’ve cancelled our plans at the last minute AGAIN. I can’t imagine how frustrating it is for them to want to go out, but to have their body decide otherwise.”

This is a big one. If I had a dollar for every time I’ve had to can plans because I can’t move, it would make me more sick or I simply need to pace myself, I woukd be able to get my painkillers gold-plated. We WANT to be out there with you. We want the normalcy of going out on a whim or looking forward to plans. When we have to call it off, we don’t gain anything from it, trust me. Please remember the person behind the illness and that we have the same social needs as you.

5. “My friend has a chronic illness but the rest of our group of friends doesn’t know. It’s not my place to ‘out’ them since they may not want everyone to know, and there’s a lot of information I don’t have.

There have been many times in my life where ‘coming out’ about my illnesses was necessary, but also many where I have been more comfortable to simly slip under the radar and pass as a regular able-bodied person. The reasons for this vary, but it should always be my choice whether or not that status is disclosed, and there have been occasions where that choice has been taken away from me by well-intentioned people trying to simply do the right thing. I ended up feeling exposed and uncomfortable, having to explain things that were sensitive to me at the time to people that may not have been the most receptive to the information – all because I didn’t get the choice.

In more extreme situations, this can cost people jobs and future employment, friendship and relationships and ultimately end in excusion, bullying and other generally shitty scenarios.

6. “We’re going out with a friend who has mobility issues tonight. We should ask them how much they can move tonight, try to find a place close by for food and also try to keep pace with them when we walk so they feel a part of the group.

This is such a simple thing, but there have been so many times where it’s gone neglected. Not due to malice, but simply because, unless you have prior experience, most able-bodied people don’t even consider that it might be an issue. Going out with someone who has mobility issues DOES change the dynamic of an evening out, despite our best efforts. Let us dictate our mobility level, help us fit in by either finding places that are only a short distance nearby, or be willing to compromise, and please include them in the group. You would be genuinely surprised how much a little gesture like keeping pace with them means – suddenly we go from feeling like a killjoy and a burden, to feeling valued, included and able to participate in conversations.

7. “I know my friend is displaying signs of being tired and in pain. Rather than telling them what I think they’re feeling, I should ask them to describe it in their words so that they have the opportunity to tell me exactly how they feel.

This one has cropped up because I had an encounter the other day with my mother. She meant well, but when I stumbled out of my room, she remarked “you’re tired”. Now, living with ME/CFS, the only time I’m not tired is when I’m exhausted. She wasn’t wrong, but by the same token, I felt like not giving me the opportunity to tell her how I was feeling in my body, she was effectively writing off the way I felt. I know it wasn’t the intention, but there are so many times when people with invisible illnesses don’t have a voice and that we have to dumb down our experiences so that we’re not called whingers or attention seekers. If you want to know how we’re feeling, just ask. Don’t assume you know what we’re experiencing. Give us that voice.

8. “This person looks to have physical issues. Rather than me deciding what they’re capable of, I’m going to let them set their own limit. After all, they know their body best.

A lot of the time we’re at an impasse – stuck between asking for help and wanting to keep some of our independence. Losing the ability to do things on our own is part of us losing our sense of self, so to keep this short, let us dictate our capacity for each occasion rather than just assuming we can’t.

There is absolutely no harm in asking if we need help, but the problem arises when you assume that we can’t do it and take away the opportunity for us to be involved.

9. “That person is walking/looking/moving a little funny or using mobility gear. It makes them stand out. It doesn’t matter if this is normal or abnormal for them, I need to respect them as a person, understand they may be feeling alienated and treat them exactly the same as I would anyone else unless asked otherwise.”

Sometimes chronic illness can manifest in different ways. I can only really speak for myself here, but I hate using my mobility gear like my cane, scooter and wheelchair since it really makes me stand out like a sore thumb. I feel awkward, I feel a bit like a freak and I hate the looks people give me where you can simply tell they’re silently judging you.

I have no issue with kids looking at me since they’re blissfully unaware of these things and mostly innocent, but when mummy or grandpa put down their coffee to gawk open-mouthed as I roll past, I feel like keeping a small stash of rabbit poo in my pocket so I can flick it at them. A lot of the time we don’t have a choice in these things – it comes down to either staying at home while out of milk and sugar (which spells disaster for a good cup of tea) or going out while using our gear.

Just remember that, behind all of that stuff, behind the limp and the sling and the walker, scooter or chair, we are just like you. We have feelings and are just as aware of the looks as you would be if you farted in the cheese isle in the shopping centre.

10. “There’s something I don’t know about their illness. You know what? I should just ask them about it rather than making assumptions. If I’m their friend, it’s good for me to know about their issues in case they need help in the future.

I really want to emphasise this one – so long as you’re respectful of us as people, we don’t bite. We actually appreciate you taking the time to learn about the issues and conditions affecting us. Just don’t come up and as “yo, cripple, why the limp?”.

This list is by no means definitive, but instead a collection of thoughts from both myself and others on the matter. Do you have something you really want added to the list? Comment below and let me know!